1. Notes: 48 / 1 year ago  from thestuartkings
    thestuartkings:

Portrait of King Charles I
By William Dobson
This important portrait of Charles I derives from sittings granted by the King while at Oxford during the Civil War. The sittings are recorded by Dobson’s first biographer, Richard Graham, who states that the King “sat several times to him for his picture” after the Court had been forced to leave London in 1642. Dobson was then, after the death of Van Dyck in 1641, the pre-eminent artist in England, and almost certainly held the post of Serjeant Painter until the King’s defeat in 1646. It is principally through Dobson’s eyes that we see the fading grandeur and increasing melancholy of the Royalist court, in stark contrast to Van Dyck’s presentation of the Caroline regime in all its swaggering glory.  Dobson’s likeness is the only depiction of Charles in oil during his campaign against Parliamentary forces in the Civil War. Lely’s portrait of Charles with his son James, by Lely (Northumberland Collection) was painted in 1647 while he was held at Hampton Court after his surrender at Newark in 1646, while Edmund Bower’s portrait of Charles at his Trial (Royal Collection), the final likeness of the King, was painted in 1649. At first glance Dobson’s portrait appears to be based on Van Dyck’s earlier likenesses. But Dobson’s careful study of Charles’ face captures perfectly the marked change in the King’s circumstances. The portrait betrays a sense of distraction not seen in the confident, flamboyant images of the 1630s. Here, Charles is portrayed in simple armour with a plain white collar against a grey background. Only the gold chain of the Garter gives any allusion to his position. The picture clearly reflects the martial atmosphere at Oxford, for, before the war, Charles had normally reserved armour for Van Dyck’s life-seized mounted portraits.

    thestuartkings:

    Portrait of King Charles I

    By William Dobson

    This important portrait of Charles I derives from sittings granted by the King while at Oxford during the Civil War. The sittings are recorded by Dobson’s first biographer, Richard Graham, who states that the King “sat several times to him for his picture” after the Court had been forced to leave London in 1642. Dobson was then, after the death of Van Dyck in 1641, the pre-eminent artist in England, and almost certainly held the post of Serjeant Painter until the King’s defeat in 1646. It is principally through Dobson’s eyes that we see the fading grandeur and increasing melancholy of the Royalist court, in stark contrast to Van Dyck’s presentation of the Caroline regime in all its swaggering glory.

    Dobson’s likeness is the only depiction of Charles in oil during his campaign against Parliamentary forces in the Civil War. Lely’s portrait of Charles with his son James, by Lely (Northumberland Collection) was painted in 1647 while he was held at Hampton Court after his surrender at Newark in 1646, while Edmund Bower’s portrait of Charles at his Trial (Royal Collection), the final likeness of the King, was painted in 1649. At first glance Dobson’s portrait appears to be based on Van Dyck’s earlier likenesses. But Dobson’s careful study of Charles’ face captures perfectly the marked change in the King’s circumstances. The portrait betrays a sense of distraction not seen in the confident, flamboyant images of the 1630s. Here, Charles is portrayed in simple armour with a plain white collar against a grey background. Only the gold chain of the Garter gives any allusion to his position. The picture clearly reflects the martial atmosphere at Oxford, for, before the war, Charles had normally reserved armour for Van Dyck’s life-seized mounted portraits.

     
  2. Notes

    1. alexroberts182 reblogged this from thestuartkings
    2. berrytear reblogged this from sine-benedictione
    3. puthraksmey reblogged this from centuriespast
    4. brittanyging reblogged this from centuriespast
    5. bloghewrote reblogged this from centuriespast
    6. netcite reblogged this from centuriespast
    7. princeofclockwork reblogged this from centuriespast
    8. d-franki reblogged this from centuriespast
    9. scotchwithsoda reblogged this from centuriespast
    10. tif-pu reblogged this from centuriespast
    11. legitsensati0ns reblogged this from centuriespast
    12. mesmatins reblogged this from centuriespast
    13. giampixxx reblogged this from centuriespast
    14. marionetting reblogged this from centuriespast
    15. centuriespast reblogged this from thestuartkings
    16. sine-benedictione reblogged this from uno-sole-minor
    17. uno-sole-minor reblogged this from thestuartkings
    18. hellohistoria reblogged this from thestuartkings
    19. ad-dc reblogged this from thestuartkings
    20. telephonecigarettes reblogged this from thestuartkings
    21. ladycassanabaratheon reblogged this from thestuartkings
    22. jimmytancredi reblogged this from thestuartkings
    23. thestuartkings posted this
avatar_128
 
 
If you are unsatisfied with your Centuries Past experience IN ANY WAY please see the guard at the front desk for A COMPLETE REFUND of your admission fee.
Your hosts into collective [un]consciousness of centuries pasts:
mostly UBU507
and occasionally our revered founder billyjane
 
 

Tumblr