C.P.

Sep 02

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797
by Richard Westall
After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.
Date painted: 1806
Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797

by Richard Westall

After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.

Date painted: 1806

Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

Nelson in Conflict with a Spanish Launch, 3 July 1797
by Richard Westall
After the Battle of St Vincent, 14 February 1797, the Spanish fleet was blockaded in Cadiz harbour by the British. The inshore squadron of the fleet was commanded by Nelson. On 3 July he sent a bomb ketch close inshore to provoke a Spanish reaction. This proved successful and Nelson launched some armed ships’ boats to rescue it, with himself in his admiral’s barge. He was accompanied by John Sykes, his coxswain, and Captain Thomas Fremantle. Although significantly outnumbered, the barge was soon locked in combat with a Spanish launch. In hand-to-hand fighting, Sykes twice saved Nelson’s life.
Date painted: 1806
Oil on canvas, 86.4 x 71.1 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

Nelson in Conflict with a Spanish Launch, 3 July 1797

by Richard Westall

After the Battle of St Vincent, 14 February 1797, the Spanish fleet was blockaded in Cadiz harbour by the British. The inshore squadron of the fleet was commanded by Nelson. On 3 July he sent a bomb ketch close inshore to provoke a Spanish reaction. This proved successful and Nelson launched some armed ships’ boats to rescue it, with himself in his admiral’s barge. He was accompanied by John Sykes, his coxswain, and Captain Thomas Fremantle. Although significantly outnumbered, the barge was soon locked in combat with a Spanish launch. In hand-to-hand fighting, Sykes twice saved Nelson’s life.

Date painted: 1806

Oil on canvas, 86.4 x 71.1 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

Nelson and the Bear
by Richard Westall
In 1773 Horatio Nelson served as a midshipman in the ‘Carcass’, which sailed under Captain Constantine Phipps on a Polar expedition to try to find a north-east passage to the Pacific. These two strongly built bomb-vessels were both obliged to return when they found their way impenetrably barred by ice to the north of Spitsbergen. During the attempt, Nelson set off with a friend to stalk a polar bear. His musket misfired and he attacked the bear with the butt-end until saved from harm by a rift in the ice, which separated him from the animal. A gun was fired from the ship to scare the bear off and Nelson justified his action to a furious Captain Lutwidge by stating that he wished to kill the bear to take its skin home to his father.
Date painted: c.1806
Oil on oak panel, 36.8 x 55.8 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

Nelson and the Bear

by Richard Westall

In 1773 Horatio Nelson served as a midshipman in the ‘Carcass’, which sailed under Captain Constantine Phipps on a Polar expedition to try to find a north-east passage to the Pacific. These two strongly built bomb-vessels were both obliged to return when they found their way impenetrably barred by ice to the north of Spitsbergen. During the attempt, Nelson set off with a friend to stalk a polar bear. His musket misfired and he attacked the bear with the butt-end until saved from harm by a rift in the ice, which separated him from the animal. A gun was fired from the ship to scare the bear off and Nelson justified his action to a furious Captain Lutwidge by stating that he wished to kill the bear to take its skin home to his father.

Date painted: c.1806

Oil on oak panel, 36.8 x 55.8 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

Engravings believed to have been made by Neanderthals more than 39,000 years ago are pictured in Gorham’s Cave, Gibraltar, in this handout photo courtesy of Stewart Finlayson of the Gibraltar Museum. Belying their reputation as the dumb cousins of early modern humans, Neanderthals created cave art, an activity regarded as a major cognitive step in the evolution of humankind, scientists reported on September 1, 2014 in a paper describing the first discovery of artwork by this extinct species.
Reuters

Engravings believed to have been made by Neanderthals more than 39,000 years ago are pictured in Gorham’s Cave, Gibraltar, in this handout photo courtesy of Stewart Finlayson of the Gibraltar Museum. Belying their reputation as the dumb cousins of early modern humans, Neanderthals created cave art, an activity regarded as a major cognitive step in the evolution of humankind, scientists reported on September 1, 2014 in a paper describing the first discovery of artwork by this extinct species.

Reuters

Lady Hamilton as Saint Cecilia
by Richard Westall
Date painted: late 18th C–early 19th C
Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

Lady Hamilton as Saint Cecilia

by Richard Westall

Date painted: late 18th C–early 19th C

Oil on canvas, 76.2 x 63.5 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

Lady Charlotte Harley (1801–1880), Later Lady Charlotte Bacon, as Hebe
by Richard Westall
Oil on canvas, 140 x 113 cm
Collection: National Trust
Where to see this painting?
National Trust, Treasurer’s House, York
Minster Yard, York, North Yorkshire, England, YO1 7JL

Lady Charlotte Harley (1801–1880), Later Lady Charlotte Bacon, as Hebe

by Richard Westall

Oil on canvas, 140 x 113 cm

Collection: National Trust

Where to see this painting?

National Trust, Treasurer’s House, York

Minster Yard, York, North Yorkshire, England, YO1 7JL

Flora
by Richard Westall
Date painted: c.1825–1830
Oil on panel, 45.3 x 37.9 cm
Collection: National Museums Liverpool

Flora

by Richard Westall

A Sunny Afternoon
by Richard Westall
Oil on canvas, 137 x 183 cm
Collection: Wolverhampton Arts and Heritage

A Sunny Afternoon

by Richard Westall

Wood, painted. Of the God’s - father of Amun, Irtierdji…. son of Nes-nebenteru and Djedhathormin. Scene of deceased adoring Osiris(?), Isis and four “Children of Horus”.
Thebes (Egypt)
Locus: Ramesseum
Period: Third Intermediate Period
Twenty-Second Dynasty
Date Made: 945 - 712 B.C.E.
Penn Museum

Wood, painted. Of the God’s - father of Amun, Irtierdji…. son of Nes-nebenteru and Djedhathormin. Scene of deceased adoring Osiris(?), Isis and four “Children of Horus”.

Thebes (Egypt)

Locus: Ramesseum

Period: Third Intermediate Period

Twenty-Second Dynasty

Date Made: 945 - 712 B.C.E.

Penn Museum

Bust of Isis to right., concept Neo-Classic rather than Egyptian. Signed in the field at left, Teresa Talanif. Neo-Classic.
Penn Museum

Bust of Isis to right., concept Neo-Classic rather than Egyptian. Signed in the field at left, Teresa Talanif. Neo-Classic.

Penn Museum